we are infinite.

There is a particular scene in The Perks of Being a Wallflower where the character exclaims: “And in that moment, I swear we were infinite”, and this quote truly resonates with me. I guess it can be interpreted differently by different people, but it always reminds me of that feeling you get when you feel one with the universe, where you are free from wants, needs or worries and are content with the present. When you feel like you can conquer everything and nothing can hurt you. And when you feel like you are part of everything, from the air that you breath to the people around you. It’s the kind of feeling that it quite hard to put into words, and I guess that’s what makes it so special. But “where words fail, music speaks” and undoubtedly, Hans Christian Andersen knows what he’s talking about.

Sometimes you come across a song that fills you up with this ethereal feeling and goosebumps appear all over your arms, like your body wants to display this enchantment to the whole world. I always save these songs so I could listen to them on repeat whenever I feel uninspired or disconnected from the world around me. They are a medicine to my soul on those days when I feel numb inside, as if I am merely existing but not truly living. So if I had to describe to you what it personally means to feel infinite and whole, just like Charlie, my only words are: listen to this playlist! If nothing else, I hope you at least enjoy the music 🙂 x

>Outro– M83
>Too Much Is Never Enough– Florence + The Machine
>Skeletons– Of Monsters and Men
>Strange– LP
>Believe– Mumford & Sons
>Punching in a Dream– The Naked and Famous
>Welcome Home, Son– Radical Face
>Moving Mountains– The Brevet
>Don’t You Cry For Me– Cobi
>Desert Song– Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros
>March: Hills to Climb– Tim Myers
>Once There Was A Hushpuppy– Dan Romer, Benh Zeitlin
>Ends of the Earth– Lord Huron
>Torches- X Ambassadors >Last Words First- Volunteer





Where has this month gone?! My mind still cannot process that we’re already a month into the new year…in fact I’m still scratching out that number seven on my notebooks! It hasn’t been such a great month health-wise, but one thing I promised myself to do this year is to focus on the things that always make me smile and help me keep a positive outlook towards life. So I am very excited to share with you my very first favourites blog post of 2018, which will include some of the things I’ve been enjoying lately, from a simple song to a quaint coffeeshop.



I read a total of 7 books this month and I enjoyed mostly all of them. In fact two of them have made it onto my all-time favourite list:

Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me– Lily Collins || 2 ☆

City of Thieves– David Benioff || 5 ☆

The Raven Boys– Maggie Stiefvater || 5 ☆

Shadow and Bone– Leigh Bardugo || 4 ☆

Memoirs of Geisha– Arthur Golden || 2 ☆

Siege and Storm– Leigh Bardugo || 4 ☆

Matilda– Roald Dahl || 4.5 ☆

I was really looking forward to read Lily Collins’ essay collection since she is one of my favorite female actors. However I was sorely disappointed in so many ways but mostly in the way that it was written. It felt quite childish, filled with meaningless and fluffy sentiments without any substance and while she did tackle various issues, she didn’t delve deep into the subject. Having said that, I found her chapters dealing with anorexia and bulimia quite insightful and I found that I could relate with her experiences. I appreciate the way she focused on eating disorder as something that can never be cured but is an ongoing process towards recovery. It will always be there waiting to come out again but she reminds the readers that they are strong and admitting you need help is never a sign of weakness. The rest of the book though just kept on repeating the same cliched advice and I wish she could have branched out in terms of subject matter and delved deeper into her experiences.

Memoirs of Geisha was quite an interesting read but it was only after finishing it that I learnt about the author’s misdeeds. According to Mineko Iwasaki, this book is riddled with errors and is quite offensive in it’s descriptions of a Geisha going through mizuage. Mrs Iwasaki gave an extensive interview to the author while he carrying out research for the book but after reading his work she brought legal action against him, with allegations of confidentiality breech and a damaged to her reputation. For this reason, I had to ditch my original 4 stars.

Weirdly enough, when it comes for me to talk about the books that I love, my mind goes blank. Maybe because there are no words that can describe all the feelings that such books can conjure, and City of Thieves is definitely one of them. The story is equal parts poetic, hilarious and devastating. I was rendered speechless with the way Benioff transitions from humour to tragedy in a single sentence and manages to show the true horrors of war while still holding on to the goodness of humanity. It is definitely one of those books that I’ll reread a thousand times! The same goes to The Raven Boys. To put it simply, this series has: an amazing cast of characters, a sassy female protagonist, a deadly kiss, GANSEY, a house full of psychic women, a dead Welsh Kings, Ley Lines, Ghosts, a mysterious Latin teacher, talking trees, a peculiar forest and unique writing style. I LOVED this book so much and I cannot wait to continue on with the series!

The first two books in The Grisha trilogy and Matilda were all rereads and I enjoyed them even more the second time round. One of the reasons why I decided to reread Leigh Bardugo’s series is so I could mentally and emotionally prepare myself for her Nikolai Lantsov duology, which is expected to be published next year. The wait is going to be absolute torture and the only way to make it bearable is to reread the hell out of her books!




Don’t you just love that feeling when you discover a new favourite song and you know it’s going to be played on repeat until your ears start to bleed?! It’s been a month filled with music that gave me chills and made me feel like I could conquer the world. Here are some of my favourites:

> The Greatest Showman soundtrack 

> Too Much Is Never Enough – Florence + The Machine

> Frozen Pines – Lord Huron

> Winter Winds – Mumford & Sons

> Don’t You Cry For Me – Cobi

> Wildfire – Seafret

> Skeletons – Of Monsters and Men

> Thunder – Imagine Dragons

If you want to check out my Spotify playlists, here is the link 🙂 x



Talbot and Bons is my favourite spot to unwind and enjoy the best cup of hazelnut cappuccino I’ve ever tasted. Also, it’s interior design is on point! The place is a short walk away from the airport and my boyfriend and I often go to the Observation Deck after having lunch. It has a wonderful view of the runway where you could watch exciting take-offs and touchdowns…and this is honestly one of my favourite ways to spend my weekend!



A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand, more specifically the All Butter Pistachio & Almonds cookies from Marks and Spencer. I would eat a whole packet in a heartbeat if I could! And if cookies are not enough, I encourage you to try the classic scones with jam and clotted cream. I use the BBC Good Food recipe because they have the best texture and flavour plus they are extremely easy to make. I do sound like I’ve been having a month-long sugar rush, which is far from the truth. But I do indulge myself over the weekend because everyone needs a treat sometimes!


Random Items

Paperchase 2018 Diary:


>Starbucks Mug: My tea tastes better in it 😉


What was your favourite thing about this month? ❤


2017 || My year in books


I am still coming to terms with the fact that another year is coming to an end. Looking back now, I would say that it wasn’t the best reading year, mostly due to the number of reading slumps that I experienced along the way. There were weeks where I couldn’t read anything to save my life and the thought of picking up a book made me even less excited to read it. All the same, I will still consider 2017 a  memorable one because this year I was willing to broaden my horizons and  explore new genres, specifically literary-fiction, non-fiction books and classics, and all of them have become my go-to choices when buying new books.

This year I set my Goodreads Reading Challenge to 80 books and for the first time ever I did not finish it. But I will in no way allow this to drag me down. After all I read for my own enjoyment…and anyway, quality over quantity right? I ended up reading a total of 66 books, which according to Goodreads translates to 21,486 pages and I’m quite happy with that number.

My shortest read was The Yellow Wall-paper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (55 pages) while the longest book was The Diviners by Libba Bray (800 pages). My first read of 2017 was Between Shades of Grey by Ruta Sepetys, a heartbreaking story that opened my eyes to the horrors of WWII. I enjoyed her writing so much and I’m really looking forward to read Salt to the Sea next year. I ended the year with Miss Brill by Katherine Mansfield, a collection of short stories that are simple yet profound.

Top 10 Favourite Books of 2017:

These are my top 10 favourite books of this year and I recommend all of them!

The Diviners– Libba Bray

The Sun and her Flowers– Rupi Kaur

The Secret History– Donna Tartt

The Language of Thorns– Leigh Bardugo

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind– Yuval Noah Harari

The Muse– Jessie Burton

Homegoing– Yaa Gyasi

Crooked Kingdom– Leigh Bardugo

Gemina– Amie Kaufman

Purple Hibiscus– Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

It’s next to impossible for me to choose a single book out of this list as my ultimate top favourite, but if I was forced to make a decision I would probably say Crooked Kingdom because my love for Kaz Brekker, Inej and the rest of the characters in the Grisha universe knows no bounds. I remember that fateful evening when I finished this book, my face was all red and blotchy and I was trying to hide my tears from the rest of the family. Honestly I am still caught between wanting to hug the book to my chest and throwing it across the room for destroying any semblance of self-control I’ve ever possessed. But it was all worth it!

Reread Books:

I love rereading books and revisiting my favourite characters, and this year was no exception. I reread a total of 19 books which seems quite a lot but Saga and Harry Potter make up most of that number.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower– Stephen Chbosky

Saga Vol 1-6– Brian K. Vaughan

Since you’ve been gone– Morgan Matson

Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour– Morgan Matson

The princess saves herself in this one– Amanda Lovelace

Harry Potter series– JK Rowling

The Graveyard Book– Neil Gaiman

The Night Circus– Erin Morgenstern

New favourite authors I discovered this year:

Donna Tartt– The Secret History was my first Donna Tartt book and it became an instant favourite. It is one of those books where you end up not knowing what to do with yourself after finishing it. Donna Tartt is a wordsmith goddess who is able to write the most pretentious and flawed characters in existence but still makes you love them dearly. I am really looking forward to read The Goldfinch next year!

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie– After finishing Purple Hibiscus, I knew I had to buy the rest of her books. Her perfectly detailed descriptions paint a wonderful picture of Nigeria and I loved reading about it so much. Also this book confirmed my innate love for character-driven stories and I hope the rest of her books are just as wonderful!

Anthony Doerr– I picked up The Shell Collector on a whim but I am so happy that I did. It is a collection of short stories that focus on nature and the human condition in all it’s forms. His writing will compel you to go outside and revel in the beauty of nature. He explores the experiences of different people, their suffering, grief, loneliness, hope…and unites them with the surrounding nature, giving each story a unique touch while at the same time combining them all together through the beauty of the universe. I am sure that All The Light We Cannot See will be just as beautiful.

Ali Smith– After reading Autumn I can confirm that Ali Smith is a genius when it comes to storytelling across a timeline. I was struck by her unique tone that changes according to the need of the story, from poetic, to conversational to downright crude and I think this is what makes her books so remarkable.

Disappointing Books:

All of these books mentioned were released in 2017 and this fact makes me even more disappointed because I’ve been anticipating their release for so long. I guess I need to learn not to allow the hype to get to my head…and my bank account.

> Caraval by Stephanie GarberI was so excited to read this book purely because it was constantly being compared with The Night Circus, which is my all-time favourite book. Fun fact: it has nothing to do with The Night Circus. Nada. I wasn’t a fan of Garber’s writing style at all. I felt like she was trying too hard to be poetic and atmospheric but ended up being too superficial and juvenile. I also didn’t like the romantic relationship in this book mostly because it felt quite rushed, forced and unnecessary and there are certain scenes that the book could definitely have gone without. I also hated the way Garber used suicide and abuse as plot devices and I would definitely not recommend this for those who are triggered by these topics.

> An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret RogersonReview Link 

> The Inexplicable Logic of my life by Benjamin Alire SaenzReview Link

> Origin by Dan Brown– Dan Brown’s books always tackle various interesting topics so I was really looking forward to read it, even though I’ve never been a huge fan of his writing style. I thoroughly enjoyed the discussions that this book raises and it made me want to read more about the subject. However I think this book fell flat when it came to the writing and the characters. The characters lack any sort of depth and ironically the only character I found truly interesting was an Artificial Intelligence. The writing felt childish at times and long paragraphs describing the history and general information about the subject slowed down the story way too much. I think this book would have been much more interesting if it was written as non-fiction.

Favourite Quotes:

“Beauty is terror. Whatever we call beautiful, we quiver before it.”

-The Secret History, Donna Tartt


“This goes to show you that sometimes the unseen is not to be feared and that those meant to love us most are not always ones who do.”

-The Language of Thorns, Leigh Bardugo


“There is no greater power on this earth than story.” Will paced the length of the room. “People think boundaries and borders build nations. Nonsense—words do. Beliefs, declarations, constitutions—words. Stories. Myths. Lies. Promises. History.” Will grabbed the sheaf of newspaper clippings he kept in a stack on his desk. “This, and these”—he gestured to the library’s teeming shelves—“they’re a testament to the country’s rich supernatural history.”


-The Diviners, Libba Bray


You can’t ever reach perfection, but you can believe in an asymptote toward which you are ceaselessly striving.”

-When Breath Becomes Air, Paul Kalanithi


“You want to know what weakness is? Weakness is treating someone as though they belong to you. Strength is knowing that everyone belongs to themselves.”

-Homegoing, Yaa Gyasi

Looking back at all these wonderful books that I’ve read makes me even more excited for  next year and all the books that will bring with it. I hope you’ve all had a wonderful year and made some wonderful memories and I hope 2018 will be a good one! To quote Neil Gaiman:

May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness. I hope you read some fine books and kiss someone who thinks you’re wonderful, and don’t forget to make some art — write or draw or build or sing or live as only you can. And I hope, somewhere in the next year, you surprise yourself.”


> Goodreads: My year in books

2018 || Bookish Resolutions

Being such an avid list maker, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to make a list focusing on bookish resolutions for next year.  These resolutions will be my own personal guidelines that will hopefully help me along the way and motivate me to read more. This year was quite disappointing in terms of books and reading in general and I can only blame myself for being such a huge procrastinator and for my bad choice of reading material. So here are my ten bookish resolutions that will hopefully make 2018 a wonderful reading experience:

1. Do not accept books for review. I know this seems a tad bit harsh but part of the reason why I didn’t read much this year was due to the fact that I never said no when authors or publishers contacted me to review their books. This inadvertently led to me stressing out over my long list of ARCs to read and review, and all this pressure took the fun out of my reading experience. I spent long weeks in perpetual reading slumps and with constant headaches trying to read eArcs on my phone. So I apologise in advance for not accepting any review requests.

2. Read more non-fiction books and classics. This point seems to crop up in every bookish resolution that I make but this time I truly mean it! A few years ago I never would have thought of checking out the non-fiction or classics section in a bookstore mostly because I’ve always had this huge misconception that such books are boring. But this year I decided to read Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari and Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf and my opinion changed completely. Non-fiction books can be as wonderful and engaging as fiction books and you can learn so much from them as well. The same can be said for classic books. My point is, don’t be scared to read a new genre…it might end up being your new favourite!

3. Read big books. Specifically A Little Life, The Goldfinch and The Bone Clock because they have been collecting dust on my shelves for way too long. I’ve always found big books intimidating, which stems from the fact that when I take a long time reading a specific book, I am more likely to fall into a reading slump. So to avoid this I will probably read a shorter book at the same time, like a poetry book or a graphic novel.

4. Participate in more Read-A-Thons because they are the best motivators to read more books. Here’s a list of the ones I will potentially take part in:

5. Finish series that I have already started. I’m talking about you Lord of the Rings. I read Fellowship of the Ring about 2 years ago and the rest of the series has been staring pleadingly on my shelves, waiting for the One Ring to be destroyed in the fires of Mount Doom. I will help you Mr. Frodo. I promise.

6. Read a Shakespeare play. The only reason why I’ve been putting this off is due to my life-long fear of the language and not being able to understand anything. But a friend of mine recommended the No Fear Shakespeare editions because they have the original text of the play on one side of the page and then the modern English version on the other. So I’m definitely giving the Bard a chance!

7. Do monthly wrap-ups on my blog. This is the only resolution that concerns this blog. As from next year I will try to do a general wrap-up at the end of each month, highlighting the books I’ve read and any monthly favorites including music, food, drinks and places I’ve visited.

8. Participate in the 2018 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge. The prompts seem like a lot of fun and also a great opportunity to find and read books that are not so well-known.

9. Goodreads Reading Challenge: 80 books. Despite the fact that I didn’t finish this year’s goal of 80 books, I will still attempt the same number for next year. But I will definitely not allow this challenge to stress me out and will only participate just so I could keep tabs of all the books that I read.

10. Lastly, READ FOR FUN. Do not allow any reading challenges to stress you out. Life is already taxing as it is without the added stress of books as well.

Do you have any bookish resolutions for 2018? I hope you all have a wonderful reading year!


Book Menus

Book Menus

Feeling hungry? Then you are about to get ravenous!

While rereading the Harry Potter series this month, I became acutely aware of the vast number of scenes in the books that either feature food, talk about food or showcase characters whose hunger pangs rival my own (I’m talking about you Ron!). Now I should probably point out (if you haven’t noticed already) that I love a sumptuous dinner as much as I love an overflowing bookshelf and whenever I come across a food scene while I’m reading, my stomach starts to growl like my next door neighbour’s dog! So I decided to write a blog post that features some of my favourite books and the types of food that are mentioned in them. I think it’s incredible to read about the different kinds of cuisines across literature, and how much these scenes add such a unique taste to the story!

Purple Hibiscus   Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Purple Hibiscus is set in Nigeria and it features different kinds of Nigerian cuisines throughout the story. Interestingly enough, Nigerian cuisine involves a great variety of colourful and aromatic dishes, using various herbs, spices, beans, meat and rice. Adichie’s writing conjured such vivid images of these luscious dishes that I was constantly hungry while I was reading it! To mention a few:

  • Fufu: A Nigerian staple food that is mentioned quite a lot in the novel. It is a dough-like dish made of boiled or ground plantain, cassava or yam that is rolled into a ball to go with soups. In fact Kambili eats it by rolling it and dipping it in the Onugbu soup.
  • Ofe Onugbu: Also known as the Bitterleaf soup, it is the most traditional Igbo soup. Apparently the name is quite misleading since the soup is not bitter at all. The leaves are washed and squeezed until all traces of bitterness is gone.
  • Egusi Soup: It is a popular Nigerian dish made from ground egusi (melon) seeds.
  • Nigerian Fried Rice: This is probably one of my favourite dishes mentioned in the book and it usually consists of rice, vegetable oil, chicken, curry with several vegetables and seasoning.
  • Utazi: It is an African herb that has a characteristically sharp taste and is used in soups and herb teas to add a bitter taste.

The Grisha trilogy Leigh Bardugo

In an interview with Wendy Darling (click this link for more info), Leigh Bardugo concurs that food forms an integral part in a story in the way it makes the fictional world more familiar and real. But authors also have the ability to twist the familiar into something extraordinary, so while you still feel at home within the fictional place, you also realise that you have been transported into a fantastical place.

If I could live on a carbs-only diet, I would! So when I read about Ravka’s Butterweek Sweet Bird-shaped Rolls, I couldn’t help imagining myself eating a whole basket! The bird-shaped rolls mentioned in Shadow and Bone are inspired by those that are still made today in Russia to celebrate the coming of Spring and the prosperity that it brings with it. These sweet buns, also called zhavoronki, are baked in the shape of larks, as a symbol of harbinger of Spring. They honestly look and sound delicious!

“‘I still have the roll,’ I offered lamely, pulling the squashed, lint-covered lump from my pocket. It had been baked into the shape of a bird to celebrate the spring flocks, but now it looked more like a rolled-up sock.

Mal dropped his head, covering it with his hands, his elbows resting on his knees. His shoulders began to shake, and for a horrible moment, I thought he might be crying, but then I realised he was laughing silently. His whole body rocked, his breath coming in hitches, tears starting to leak from his eyes. ‘That better be one hell of a roll,’ he gasped.”

 Dinner at the Grand Palace in Os Alta doesn’t sound bad either!

 “The food was less alien than I’d expected, the kind of food we’d eaten on feast days at Keramzin: sweet pea porridge, quail roasted in honey, and fresh figs. I found I was hungrier than I’d ever been and had to resist picking up my plate to lick it.”

The Night Circus Erin Morgenstern 

The Night Circus is one of my all-time favourite books. Le Cirque des Rêves for me embodies everything that I love: from the food, to the attractions, and the palpable magic in the air. I was constantly imagining myself wandering its paths and weaving around the tents the whole time I was reading it, smelling the cider in the air and licking chocolate off my fingers. Just picture yourself eating some of these:

Caramel apples, black and white striped paper bag of chocolate or caramel covered popcorn, chocolate mice with almond ears and liquorice tails, cinnamon rolls covered in icing, spiced cocoa and cider.

“Apples dipped in caramel so dark they appeared almost blackened but remained light and crisp and sweet.”

One also cannot fail from mentioning Chandresh Christophe Lefèvres’ famous Midnight Dinners. They were famous for having no menus just to add to the experience, and while some dishes were recognizable, others were more enigmatic, hidden beneath sweet sauces or inside pastries. Chandresh himself admits that not knowing all the ingredients gives the dish life and ‘makes it more than the sum of its parts’.

Just to mention a few: quail, rabbit or lamb served on banana leaves or baked in apples, garnished with brand-soaked cherries, berries bursting with creams and liquors, figs dripping with honey, sugar blown into curls and flowers and pastries lighter than air.

Harry Potter J.K. Rowling

It wouldn’t be right to forget the very books that inspired this post! I guess we can all agree that J.K Rowling is a wordsmith goddess, able to infuse the mundane with a touch of her own kind of magic. So naturally, the food mentioned in the books are exquisite and bound to make you hungry just by reading about them. There’s also something comforting to read about all those overflowing and scrumptious dishes, maybe because they remind me of family gatherings, Christmas dinners or my mum’s cooking, with the mouth-watering smell permeating every room in the house.

So let’s start off with the infamous food trolley on the Hogwarts Express:

  • Chocolate Frogs
  • Liquorice Wands
  • Bertie Bott’s Every Flavour Beans
  • Drooble’s Best Blowing Gum
  • Pumpkin pasties
  • Cauldron Cakes

The Hogwarts Feast is always bursting with the most delicious food imaginable:

“He had never seen so many thing he liked to eat on one table: roast beef, roast chicken, pork chops and lamb chops, sausages, bacon and steak, boiled potatoes, roast potatoes, fries, Yorkshire pudding, peas, carrots, gravy, ketchup, and for some strange reason, peppermint humbugs.”

“Blocks of ice cream in every flavour you could think of, apple pies, treacle tarts, chocolate eclairs and jam doughnuts, trifle, strawberries, Jell-O, rice pudding—“

Nothing can rival the Start-of-Term Feast, except maybe…the Christmas Feast! It mainly consisted of hundreds of fat, roast turkeys, mounds of roasted and boiled potatoes, platters of fat chipolatas, tureens of buttered peas, silver boats of thick, rich gravy and cranberry sauce. And for dessert, flaming Christmas puddings with silver sickles hidden within.

I also cannot fail from mentioning Hagrid’s jaw-breaking rock cakes; shapeless lumps with raisins that often broke their teeth! Or his infamous birthday cake he made especially for Harry on his eleventh birthday.

It’s a personal dream of mine to one-day taste Mrs. Weasley’s cooking! If only I could receive her homemade fudge and toffee for Christmas! And I think we can all agree that there is no one able to whip up a delicious feast like Molly Weasley!

By seven o’clock, the two tables were groaning under dishes and dishes of Mrs Weasley’s excellent cooking, and the nine Weasleys, Harry and Hermione were settling themselves down to eat beneath a clear, deep-blue sky. To somebody who had been living on meals of increasingly stale cake all summer, this was paradise, and at first, Harry listened rather than talked, as he helped himself to chicken-and-ham pie, boiled potatoes and salad.

A trip to Hogsmeade will often lead you to Honeydukes, a store bursting with the most delectable sweets ever! 

“There were shelves upon shelves of the most succulent-looking sweets imaginable. Creamy chunks of nougat, shimmering pink squares of coconut ice, fat, honey-coloured toffees; hundreds of different kinds of chocolate in neat rows; there was a large barrel of Every Flavour Beans, and another of Fizzing Whizzbees, the levitating sherbet balls that Ron had mentioned; along yet another wall were ‘Special Effects’ sweets: Drooble’s Best Blowing Gum (which filled a room with bluebell-coloured bubbles that refused to pop for days), the strange, splintery Toothflossing Stringmints, tiny black Pepper Imps (‘breathe fire for your friends!’), Ice Mice (‘hear your teeth chatter and squeak!’), peppermint creams shaped like toads (‘hop realistically in the stomach!’) , fragile sugar-spun quills and exploding bonbons.”

And if you’re feeling chilled to the bone, you can always visit Madam Rosmerta at the Three Broomsticks for a glass of Butterbeer, Firewhiskey, gillywater, mulled mead, red currant rum, or cherry syrup and soda with ice and an umbrella.

That’s it for today but I will definitely write another similar post soon! I’m just going to nip downstairs for a bite to eat now…because I’m starving!



things that make me happy


Sometimes life can get quite overwhelming and I end up rushing through the week feeling scattered and exhausted. It becomes so easy to take things for granted, giving the things that matter barely a second glance and focusing instead on the issues that are actually causing me more harm than good. So it’s nice to have a list of reference to turn to as a reminder of the simple things in life that bring me indescribable joy or just a smile on my face. And who doesn’t love making lists anyway?!

  • Books. The feel of the rough pages between your fingertips. The earthy scent of old books prickling your nose. Reading while listening to the musical sound of the rain outside. Books that sweep you away into a new adventure. Book shopping.
  • Harry Potter. Rereading the books. Watching the movies on a Saturday night. Discussing theories with my best friend.
  • Tea. Chilly fingers wrapped around a steaming mug. Gulping down a melted biscuit after dunking it in a cup of tea.
  • Forests. A canopy of leaves. An illustrious display of colours, from green to orange-brown. Hidden trails and new discoveries. The sound of crunching leaves underfoot.
  • Sunsets. The sky painted an array of pink, orange and yellow. The pale moon peeking out amongst the stars.
  • Summer. Beaches. Local feasts. Fireworks. Picnics.
  • Autumn. Warm comfy sweaters. Orange-red hues everywhere you look. Drinking hot cocoa with a book propped up on your knees. Cuddling in warm fuzzy blankets. Pumpkin spiced lattes. Fall-scented candles. Combat boots.
  • Beaches. The sound of the lapping waves. Gritty sand between your toes. A morning swim. Ice-cream cones.
  • Stationary. Cards, notebooks, planners, pens, pencils.
  • Family gatherings. Sharing inside jokes. Fighting over a game of Monopoly!
  • Friends. Mutual respect. The feeling that you belong. Making each other laugh. Hilarious video chats.
  • The book community. Meeting so many wonderful and talented people. You make my life a thousand times more beautiful and meaningful.
  • Weekends. Saturday night in watching a movie. Sunday lunch.
  • Airports. The sound of airplanes taking-off/landing. Watching people leave and trying to imagine where their flight will be taking them. The anticipation of adventure.


  • Music. Finding a new favourite song. Road trip playlists. Book playlists. Coldplay. Gregory Alan Isakov. Lord Huron. Hozier. Vampire Weekend. Florence + the Machine. The Travellers.
  • Memories. Looking at old photographs. Reading old diaries. Coming across a stash of long-forgotten letters.
  • Food. The smell of baking bread and ground coffee. The first bite into a piping hot cupcake. Licking the frosting off your fingers. Coffeeshops.
  • Sounds: crickets in the trees, rain pattering on the windowpanes, trees swaying in the wind, birds chirping, a distant thunderstorm, the sound of cake batter being mixed with a wooden spoon, wind chimes, horse’ footsteps on cobblestones. The sound of silence.
  • Photography. Capturing a perfect moment. Discovering new places. When your pictures turn out the way you wanted them to.
  • Shopping. Browsing online bookstores. Christmas shopping with my sister. When your order finally arrives in the mail.
  • Vacations. Not having to wake up early for work. Traveling to new places. Discovering yourself. Making new memories.
  • Animals. Memories of my dog: You are gone but you will always be in my heart.

What makes you happy? ❤


Bookish Pet Peeves: Annoying Tropes Edition

Bookish Pet Peeves: Annoying Tropes Edition

As much as I love and cherish books, there are so many awful tropes out there that make me question why I’m reading said books in the first place. Now I need to point out that certain tropes can make quite an interesting story…but not if every single book being published is using it, with no signs of creativity or originality on the author’s part. The point of reading a book is to discover something different, but if authors keep writing the same insta-love stories or the ‘cute yet mysterious boy next door’ shit, then we are defeating the purpose of reading in the first place.

 So today I present to you a list of some of the most annoying tropes I’ve come across so far in books [emphasis on some!]


 Let me start with the most obvious and the one that makes my blood boil. There is no such thing as insta-love, not on this earth or any other planet (in my opinion anyway). Insta-like maybe but not LOVE…or the ‘Oh I just met you and this is crazy but I don’t want to live without you’ crap. If a guy tells me that he fell in love with me the minute he saw me I would be insulted, purely because he would have fallen ‘in love’ with my appearance not with my character or personality. It is quite sad to see these books constantly being published and putting forth a false message to all the young readers out there. Even fantasy books need to be realistic sometimes.

Unnecessary Romance

I finished reading Caraval recently and I found the romance in the book very unnecessary and off-putting. I don’t understand why many YA novels have to have romance in them, as if that’s the single most important thing in the entire universe. It’s also frustrating when said romance overshadows the main plot, leaving no room for any character or plot development. Also, why do the characters have to kiss and grope each other in the most unlikely situations? ‘Oh look they’re chasing after us…let us kiss’. I don’t need to add anything to that.

Being ‘Cured’ by a Love Interest

Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella instantly comes to mind when I mention this trope. Honestly this needs to stop because the message these books are sending is so awful and problematic. No love interest can ever cure someone from a mental illness. They can obviously help by offering their support and being there for them but it does not mean that you are instantly ‘cured’ just because you’ve fallen in love with someone. Mental illness is not a joke to be messed around with. If an author does not feel competent to write about it then they should stop what they’re doing and do their research instead of writing such damaging stories.

Romanticising Bad Boys and Abusive Relationships

The heading should speak for itself. This is such a disgusting message to be sending to young readers and even readers in general. People do not need to read these problematic books but rather books that makes them understand how much they deserve better than to be with someone who does not respect them. Everyone is worth more than the value their ‘significant other’ puts on them. I also hate it so much when authors try to justify the abusers by writing about the struggles of their past which leads to the reader excusing their behaviour and outright ignoring their actions. These books are making people of all genders believe that abusive relationships are actually not bad and that abusers should be idolised. People need to realise how dangerous these books can be, especially to the ones who are actually living in an abusive relationship.

‘You’re Not Like Other Girls’

I don’t know why people find the idea of belittling other women just to make another character more likeable, even remotely appealing. When an author differentiates a female character from others, as though women are this monolith category, we are reducing the very beauty of what makes us different. Rather than priding ourselves in all the ways that make us who we are, people are making us hate on each other as if we are in a competition that we didn’t sign up for. There is no ‘wrong’ way of being a girl. There are girls who love wearing make-up and others who don’t, girls who love to read, watch sports, get drunk; girls who hate going to parties and other who do. And they are all amazing. It would be a compliment if someone told me that I’m like other girls because all of us are wonderful and beautiful. And if some man tells me otherwise I will send him back home to look up the definition of an actual compliment.

Lack of Diversity

There is no going around the fact that there is an awful lack of representation of LGBTQ, POC, disabled people or people living with a chronic illness in books. Having said that, readers are becoming more informed about this and are pointing it out on various social medias, which in turn helps to raise awareness. Why do we need diverse books? Because the world IS DIVERSE and when you’re not including diverse characters in your books, you are actually putting a blindfold on yourself and your readers. Everyone should have a chance to be represented in the stories that we tell, no ifs or buts. I also need to add that we need more diverse characters as protagonists and not just as secondary characters just so authors can say that they have included a diverse character in their story.

Convenient Endings

 ‘The character dies in the last couple of pages.’

‘The Happily Ever After.’

‘The defenceless character who suddenly finds a knife on the ground to kill her enemy.’

‘The new character that is introduced in the end just to tie everything up nicely.’

These are just some annoying ways a story could end that will without doubt ruin the whole tone of the book. A bad ending for me is a sign that the author has lost interest in the story, which is quite sad especially when the rest of the book is really interesting and fascinating. The ending is as important as the introduction.

The Ordinary Characters Who Suddenly Gain Superpowers

This trope is getting way too old. It is so unrealistic to have characters that are suddenly able to wield a sword (and are the best fighters amongst their peers) without having been taught before. I have been seeing this quite a lot in YA fantasy books lately. While I applaud the idea of having a character represented as a warrior who fights for what is right, many are written without any personality, as if their fighting skills are the only thing that defines them. A strong character does not necessarily mean having physical strength. We need to see more characters that are also flawed (because no one is perfect), intelligent or have a strong personality.

 Unfortunately the list is way way longer and I will definitely write a continuation post in the near future. What are some of your bookish pet peeves? Feel free to comment 🙂