Review || Eighteen Years- Madisen Kuhn

Eloquent || Honest || Inspiring 

After reading Milk & Honey and The Princess Saves Herself in This One [two wonderful books I have to say], I realised that poetry is truly the ultimate remedy for your soul and after experiencing it, I knew that I couldn’t live without it. So I bought myself a copy of Eighteen Years and I have to say it’s the best thing I’ve done in quite a while!

This collection of poems is a journey of thoughts, encounters and a multitude of emotions. Every page hosts a short passage that deals with heartbreak, anxiety, depression, love, loss and identity, amongst others. My favourite collection by far is the Winter 2012-2013 collection, mostly because I related to it the most. The reason why I didn’t give it 5 stars though is because there were a number of poems I didn’t really connect to, which obviously doesn’t mean that they’re not worth reading…not at all. This is just a matter of personal opinion. I found certain poems repetitive, specifically the ones that deal with a bad breakup and was hoping for something uplifting amongst them. Having said that, I can totally understand why there will be passages that will read your heart and soul and others that you will never truly grasp simply because to really understand them you need to experience first hand the reality she was describing. But thanks to these poems, I was given an insight to what she was going through and I appreciate that.

you are my thoughts as

the sun rises, and my dreams

after it has set

Madisen Kuhn’s writing spoke to me on such a personal level, as if her poems were written just for me and I’m pretty sure that everyone who has read/will read it will relate to it in some way or another, regardless of the age, gender or your experiences. And this made me come to realise how much everyone is connected even if we are not always aware of it. We are all tied together by our thoughts, feelings and emotions; invisible threads spinning across the universe.

This brilliant prose proved to me that words could be the best remedy for your soul. It offered me comfort when other things failed. It soaked up my tears and opened my heart to new opportunities. It reminded me that while life is not always easy, we can always find strength within ourselves to overcome our obstacles. Scars are the reminder that we are human. Beautiful and strong.

the world is dirt,

i have seen

the most beautiful flowers

spring up

from it’ soil

(please do not pluck them all)

 every rose has thorns,

but that shouldn’t be a reason

to neglect it’s petals

The writing explicitly showed how much the author poured her heart and soul into her work and bared her heart to us for a chance to understand ours. Sometimes you love something and think about it so much that you are rendered speechless. You can barely find the proper words to describe your feelings coherently. These poems somehow awaken that silent creature within you and as it rises from its slumber you are keenly aware of everything around you: the shadows on your bedroom wall, the creaking of the floor, birds chirping outside and your own heartbeat dancing along to it’s own music. I loved this collection of poems mostly because it made me appreciate the simplest details in my life that I have often neglected. And it is only by treasuring these little moments will you be able to truly value the bigger ones.

who are you,

really?

you are not a name

or a height or a weight

or a gender,

you are not an age

and you are not

where you are from

you are your favorite books

and the songs stuck in your head,

you are your thoughts

and what you eat for breakfast

on Saturday mornings

you are a thousand things,

but everyone chooses

to see the million things

you are not

you are not

where you are from

you are

where you’re going

and I’d like

to go there

too

May this book make you fall in love with everything that is beautiful: life…and you. x

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Rating:  ☆☆☆☆

  • Genre: Poetry
  • Edition: Createspace, November 2015, Paperback
  • Pages: 266
  • Source: Wordery